Gîte B&B in Isère > Tourism > Archeological sites > Archeological gardens in Vienne (35km)

Archeological gardens in Vienne (35km)

Archeological gardens in Vienne (35km)

On the site of the former hospices, it presents the complex remains of part of the Gallo-Roman town: arcades of a portico of the forum, the wall of a municipal assembly hall, houses and terraces.

Archeological treasures of Vienne

Vienne is one of the oldest towns in the region. It can be admired from the heights of the Pipet, from the belvedere built at the beginning of our era, as can the very beautiful panorama of the city, the majesty of the Rhone, the hillsides covered with prestigious vineyards (Côte-Rôtie, Condrieu, Sotanum,...) and in the distance, to the south, in the heart of the  Nature reserve, the Pilat range of mountains.

During the fifth century before our era, some human settlements were found thanks to recent archeological excavations. Towards the third century B.C. Vienne belonged to the Allobroges Gauls who made it their capital. However, it owes its glory and riches to the Roman Empire. Vienne possesses one of the richest archeological patrimonies in France, dating back to that period.

The Vienne arenas, The Roman amphitheatre

Set on the Pipet hill, to the east of the forum, the amphitheatre, which could accommodate up to 12000 persons (9000 today), stretches over 115 meter diameter north-south. The orchestra (central area) surrounded by four rows which formerly held up the marble seats with griffin feet, still shows some of its marble coating. A stone parapet separates this part, reserved for the elite, from two series of twelve and thirty rows, linked by two roofed corridors called "vomitoria". A terrace, decorated with a portico overlooks the whole...

The necropolis

Archeological excavations carried out from 1976 to 1984 in the chevet of Saint-Pierre and inside Saint-Georges, have enabled studies to be carried out on ancient structures (Gallo-Roman quarters, mausoleums and graveyards dating from the fourth century up to the Revolution). The Saint-Georges oratory is mentioned for the first time during the sixth century. It was reconstructed at the end of the ninth century and became a parish church during the eleventh century.

Archeological garden in Cybèle

On the site of the former hospices, it presents the complex remains of a part of the Gallo-Roman town: arcades of a portico of the forum, the wall of a municipal assembly hall, houses and terraces.

 



http://www.vienne-tourisme.com

[04/07/2009]